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Home > Science and research > Structure, Composition and Evolution of the Earth's Crust > Volcanics

Volcanics

In the territory of the Czech Republic, volcanic activity took place during the Lower and Upper Palaeozoic and later during the Tertiary with some events persisting into the Quaternary.

The use of a drone to photograph a rock face in the vicinity of the Trosky Castle ruins in the Czech Paradise

Volcanic structures exposed on inaccessible rock faces can be observed and photographed using a remote controlled helicopter drone carrying a camera. This enables close-up views and innovative perspectives of volcanic bodies to be captured. The use of a drone to photograph a rock face in the vicinity of the Trosky Castle ruins in the Czech Paradise is shown. (Author: V. Rapprich)

Vulcanologists investigate the composition of magmas and the forms of volcanic and sub volcanic bodies. Using enclaves carried up by the eruptive rocks, the processes governing melting at the boundary between the Earth’s crust and mantle, and mixing of magmas of different compositions can be interpreted.

Columnar jointing in alkali basalts at Zlatý vrch (the Golden Hill), the  so-called “Basaltic Organ’

Columnar jointing in alkali basalts at Zlatý vrch (the Golden Hill), the so-called “Basaltic Organ’.

Although there are no historical records of eruptions or other dangerous phenomenon related to volcanic activity in the Czech Republic, during the comparatively recent period of geological history a few million years ago, extensive volcanic activity accompanied the reactivation of old fault zones affecting large areas of Bohemia and Moravia. This probably took place in response to the stresses imposed on the Bohemian Massif by the Alpine orogeny that was taking place to the South and East of the Czech Republic. At present, subtle, barely noticeable earthquakes, mud volcanoes, and other post-volcanic phenomenon occur, e.g. in the surroundings of the town of Cheb, that indicate the presence of an active magma chamber below the surface in northern Bohemia.

In addition to improving the understanding of volcanic processes and their associated hazards, the mapping of volcanic rocks brings to light new resources of industrial minerals and raw materials, e.g. zeolites and bentonite.

icon of contactsContacts

Czech Geological Survey
Klárov 131/3
118 21 Praha 1
phone: +420257089530
fax: +420 257 531 376
vladislav.rapprich@geologycz